COVID-19 cases as of Sunday, March 22

Wisconsin has now seen multiple confirmed cases of COVID-19.

As of Saturday, March 21, Wisconsin DHS reports four deaths in the state from COVID-19 with two in Milwaukee county and one each in Ozaukee and Fond du Lac County. There are 281 positive cases reported and another 4,628 negative test results.

By Sunday, Wisconsin DHS reports four deaths in the state from COVID-19 with two in Milwaukee County and one each in Ozaukee and Fond du Lac counties. There are 381 positive cases reported and another 6,230 negative test results.

The state reports no cases in Rusk County as of Sunday afternoon, March 21.

With more testing facilities online, expect to see even more cases. Identifying cases allows Wisconsin Department of Health Services and local partners to move quickly to isolate a case and possibly contain spread of the virus.

People can help do that by following basic hygiene practices. Wash hands with soap and water, cover coughs, and if you are sick — stay home.

The Center for Disease Control is responding to a pandemic of respiratory disease spreading from person-to-person caused by a novel (new) coronavirus. The disease has been named “coronavirus disease 2019” (abbreviated “COVID-19”). This situation poses a serious public health risk. The federal government is working closely with state, local, tribal, and territorial partners, as well as public health partners, to respond to this situation. COVID-19 can cause mild to severe illness; most severe illness occurs in older adults.

Different parts of the country are seeing different levels of COVID-19 activity. The United States nationally is in the initiation phase of the pandemic. States in which community spread is occurring are in the acceleration phase. The duration and severity of each pandemic phase can vary depending on the characteristics of the virus and the public health response.

Twenty-seven U.S. states are reporting some community spread of COVID-19.

This is the first pandemic known to be caused by the emergence of a new coronavirus. In the past century, there have been four pandemics caused by the emergence of novel influenza viruses. As a result, most research and guidance around pandemics is specific to influenza, but the same premises can be applied to the current COVID-19 pandemic. Pandemics of respiratory disease follow a certain progression outlined in a “Pandemic Intervals Framework.” Pandemics begin with an investigation phase, followed by recognition, initiation, and acceleration phases. The peak of illnesses occurs at the end of the acceleration phase, which is followed by a deceleration phase, during which there is a decrease in illnesses. Different countries can be in different phases of the pandemic at any point in time and different parts of the same country can also be in different phases of a pandemic.

The risk from COVID-19 to Americans can be broken down into risk of exposure versus risk of serious illness and death.

Risk of exposure:

  • The immediate risk of being exposed to this virus is still low for most Americans, but as the outbreak expands, that risk will increase. Cases of COVID-19 and instances of community spread are being reported in a growing number of states.
  • People in places where ongoing community spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 has been reported are at elevated risk of exposure, with the level of risk dependent on the location.
  • Healthcare workers caring for patients with COVID-19 are at elevated risk of exposure.
  • Close contacts of persons with COVID-19 also are at elevated risk of exposure.
  • Travelers returning from affected international locations where community spread is occurring also are at elevated risk of exposure, with level of risk dependent on where they traveled.

Risk of Severe Illness:

Early information out of China, where COVID-19 first started, shows that some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from this illness. This includes:

Older adults, with risk increasing by age.

People who have serious chronic medical conditions like:

Heart disease

Diabetes

Lung disease

(1) comment

Carol White

Also at risk are smokers.

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